From the art room..., From the classroom...

Old And New…

Some time ago I had a last minute idea that involved students making art to decorate the gym for a concert.  Last minute ideas often end up being executed with last minute supplies, and this one stayed true to that rule…

  

I rummaged through the art room cupboards to find, in a dark dusty corner, some old forgotten rolls of mismatched wallpaper samples, ends of gift wrap rolls and some odd shaped scraps no one else could find a use for. What could they become?
  

I had two weeks and over 100 students (ages 6-10) to work with.  Some of them were eager to be artists, and others came at the process with great reluctance. What, and how, could we create?

  

In the end I chose a different theme for each grade, gave them basic instructions for shapes, and let them create their pieces using the materials at hand. 

 

The end results were as creative and diverse as the students themselves. No two were alike, even with the simple repeated constructs, and every  picture captured the personality of the artist. Amazing. 

  

  
None of these materials you see was originally intended for the purpose of “art”. They had all been relegated to the back of the closet as relics of another time, unable to fulfill their design destiny (brown floral wallpaper anyone?), but with a little bit of imagination and the right tools they became not just one but many new things…
       

  

Going in to this activity we didn’t have a picture of what our efforts would produce, but we had curiosity and enthusiasm for sure. The “doing” part was messy. The “engagement” part was awesome. And the end results were as unique as the sticky fingerprints all over my resource room floor. Hmmm. 

  
  

Thinking about the explore-connect-create process in this context reminds me of an artist’s quote that caught my attention at the Vancouver Art Gallery this past summer: 

“The possible does not have to be justified by the known.” (Wolfgang Paalen)

In other words, we might not know where we are going. In fact, we probably don’t. But that shouldn’t stop us from exploring and doing as we discover what possibilities await…

  

  

Looking back at these pictures of the creative and highly individual found-art project, I am seeing them with the eyes of an “old” teacher exploring the “new” curriculum. For me they make an interesting metaphor: familiar materials, imagination, open ended exploration and guided structure to create something new and ultimately more personal. Is that kind of what it looks like to you?

  

  

The teachers here in BC are well into the implementation of the “new” curriculum by now, but we are still really only at the beginning of understanding the shift in thinking, teaching and learning that is required of us as we move towards discoveries in a world that is evolving faster every day. It feels unsettling, to be sure, but we shouldn’t forget that we already have many of the essential tools in our supply cupboard…

    

  

Watching children create is the thing that inspires me most as a teacher. It reminds me of the passion and enthusiasm that set me on this path to a life in education so many years ago. It encourages me, especially on the difficult days, to remember what is really essential in education. 

  

  

Curiosity, creativity, opportunity, affiliation… 

These things we must have, regardless of what the current theme of the curriculum may be. If children love learning and playing and making – if they have the opportunity and the encouragement and the guidance – then they have everything they need to do great things. 
  

Wherever you are, I hope these things are part of your daily life too…

“To see a World in a grain of sand, And Heaven in a wild flower, Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand, And Eternity in an hour.…”

(William Blake, from Auguries of Innocence)


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From the classroom...

Pop! Bang! (Back to School…)

It may be hard to believe but we are back to school already. Summers seem to come and go faster and faster every year, possibly in direct proportion to my excitement and anticipation, or maybe in relation to the lengthy list of chores I hope to accomplish…

This summer was a particularly fast one, with a dismal start (cold, cold rainy days at the outdoor pool) a disorganized middle (were we coming? going? camping? renovating? moving?!) and a then fast finish so frantic that here we are again, in September.  Boom. 

  

Back to school is a time that creates mixed feelings in many people. It’s exciting to reconnect with the friends and colleagues we haven’t seen all summer, and it’s fun to get all new school things (crisp unbroken crayons, shiny sharp pencils, clean white erasers and piles of notebooks – Miss G. is a connoisseur…) but the older I get and the longer I teach the more I become aware of the challenges involved too. 

  

For many children (teachers, parents…) the adrenaline and anxiety wrapped up in anticipation of a new school year add a lot of pressure onto what can already be an emotional time. Sleep schedules are shifting – some people can’t get enough sleep to get through the day, and some can’t stop sleeping in time to adjust to new schedules.  Eating habits are hard to get back into (only eating at the breaks?!) and that’s all before thinking about homework or practice schedules… Full stop to full blast in what feels like an instant
  

Emotions are close to the surface, which makes new routines and responsibilities even more challenging.  Many who normally have no problems with the expectations of daily life are stretched by new environments, new colleagues, new classmates, new programs… What might have been manageable in ideal circumstances now seems just a little bit scary. 

 

Sometimes the adrenaline and anticipation that get us through those first few days vanishes under a pile of books and assignments, draining the reserves of summer quicker than we thought possible, leaving us feeling more than a little bit flat…

 

In these opening moments give yourself creative license to get through the stops and starts of a new season.  Notice the people around you – especially the outliers and the quiet ones – who need just a little more empathy than usual…

“Empathy is strength, and an asset towards surviving and thriving in any environment. It promotes genuine curiosity about others, which facilitates a desire to teach and learn.” (Ugo Uche)

(Art by Gr.5 students…)

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From the classroom...

Mixed Colours (Mixed Emotions…)

September can be complicated.

The changing of seasons from summer to the earliest days of fall is exciting for all the colours, flavours and adventures there are in store for us, but some changes are less exciting and more worrisome… During all of our “back to school” preparations this year I was more and more aware of  the challenges the season brings.

My oldest child made a big leap into the “intermediate” grades this year – teachers often say that it is the transition from the “learning to read” years into the “reading to learn” years – she will now begin to build the bank of information and knowledge that she needs to develop her own understanding of the world around her.  As a teacher, I am excited for her growth and learning.  As a parent I am terrified at the anxiety and emotion she is carrying with her into her new classroom.  The last weeks of summer vacation were marked by regular moments of reassurance as she worked to prepare herself for the unknown…  How many other little people are carrying that same mix of apprehension and excitement into the school year?

This is her self-portrait on the eve of back to school:

 I see how beautiful she is in this picture, but I see the reservations she has as well – she has captured the feeling of cautious optimism perfectly…  She is worried that she isn’t smart enough or fast enough for the demands of fourth grade… Her amazing talents are overshadowed by her own self-doubt.

My youngest child will be attending “real school” this year too – another milestone moment.  He is excited about playing with his friends and seeing his big sister on the playground, but less thrilled about getting out of his warm bed every single day and getting into his school uniform again

Instead of drawing himself he drew a picture of his mama and dada to keep with him.  I think it’s a good likeness:

He has captured my mixed emotions about the “back to school” season…

I am looking forward to seeing my friends, colleagues and students, but at the same time I am feeling overwhelmed by the challenges that lay ahead.  I am excited to take on new projects, but sad to leave the long days of summer behind…  Mixed emotions. Double dip feelings.

  How many children and families are feeling the same way?  In our hurry to get back to school and work, how many children are feeling overwhelmed by the pressures of production, performance, perfection that school creates?   In this whirlwind of mixed emotions I am making an extra effort to see the colours of the season.  I am making the effort to see the great promise in the children who are showing up at school every day in spite of the anxiety and adversity in they might feel.  I am trying to let go of the apprehension I have about sending my own children off to school on their own to learn and grow without my constant supervision and support…  In a month or two we will hardly remember these early days of fragile confidence and nervousness.  I know that my little people are in good hands, just as I know that I will do my best for the students who come for help at my own classroom door.  But this season of mixed emotions reminds me, more than ever, to have empathy for the families who are struggling to get all the “pieces in their places” as the “new year” takes its’ shape with all the colours of the season…

“I have always had school sickness, as others have seasickness. I cried when it was time to go back to school long after I was old enough to be ashamed of such behavior.” (Jacques Derrida)

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From the classroom...

The (School) Year in Review…

Today is the first official day of summer vacation. As is our tradition, we started our morning at the pool, which is helping with the melancholy mood my children are feeling after closing the door on school for the year…

It is a testament to their teachers over the last ten months that they are so sad about moving on. Even with the prospect of family field trips and free time my little people are finding it hard to let go!

In celebration of all those months of learning we have combed through the school scrapbooks many times.  These are some of our favourite moments…

   

                 

   

               

“Aaah, summer – that long anticipated stretch of lazy, lingering days, free of responsibility and rife with possibility. It’s a time to hunt for insects, master handstands, practice swimming strokes, conquer trees, explore nooks and crannies, and make new friends.” (Darell Hammond)

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From the classroom...

Earth Month…

These pictures have been hanging in our primary hallway for a week or two… Every time I have walked past I have enjoyed their bright colours but I didn’t stop to look closely at them until I was passing by with one of our kindergarten students. “Why are those pictures in jail?” he asked me. Why indeed? It occurred to me then that the world we love is in fact “in jail”, and our use/abuse of it doesn’t show signs of easing any time soon. 

How can we be holding our planet hostage while holding our own extravagant desires in such high regard?  Our picture of the world around us is fragmented by the constant strain we put on it… no wonder we can’t see clearly.

          

Each one of these picture shows an idyllic landscape, but reminds us that the both the earth and our visions of it are seriously distorted…

      

Last week Miss G. came home from school with a large, blank piece of paper and a mission. As it is earth month, her school was having an environmental poster challenge; make a poster to convey a message using recycled and recyclable materials… She was inspired…

Here in the Pacific Northwest our daily lives are closely connected to the ocean… it was the perfect candidate for some environmental research…

  

  

  

The ocean makes up 70% of our planet and currently contains enough plastic garbage to stack to the moon and back twice. Find out more here and here

  

 

 

 

 

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From the classroom...

#edcamp35

I just spent a gorgeous sunny Saturday with 200 other passionate people talking about and celebrating education – thank you edcamp for inspiring me (again!) to be a learner as much as a teacher on this journey…

The best part of edcamp is the people – many ages, many levels of connection to education, and many many diverse talents. It is a fantastic opportunity for inspiration, connection and collaboration. It is the reason I became a teacher – to be passionate in a community of people who share that same enthusiasm for life and learning…

Today’s story in pictures:

  

                

 

Questions!  I don’t have answers for them all, but I don’t think the point is the answers. I think the point is the conversations. That is the power of edcamp for me – so many people are having conversations about teaching and learning. Awesome.

 

We teach kids. And in the process, we learn. A lot.

I’m still processing the many thoughts and ideas that filtered through my day and, just like at my last edcamp experience, I’m amazed and encouraged by the ways the different ideas are in sync – it makes me feel like we are moving in the right direction. I think the most important thing is to keep having the conversation. It is the most important one we could have, and I look forward to sharing more thoughts here as we continue making connections together.

 

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From the classroom...

Creative Construction…

Two weeks ago I spent a Saturday at my first Edcamp (#edcampdelta – awesome!) where the discussions kept returning to similar concepts: child centred, problem based, inquiry based, play based, hands on, maker movement learning.  All of these terms, as one participant noted, are reiterations of the same basic idea: let kids play.  Let them play.  Give them some tools and some materials and some ideas or questions and let them come up with their own curriculum…   Is this new?

This afternoon I sat in a staff meeting with a group of adults contemplating whether we could handle the concept of play and whether or not our students could handle just one afternoon (two hours!) of unstructured unplugged free play.  Two hours!  Is this really happening?!  Have we gone so far astray that children are completely unable to play?  Stay tuned – we voted in favour of trying it out.  Next week, on Global School Play Day, we will find out if it is in fact possible for kids to learn through unstructured play.  Can’t wait!

In the meantime, I have some photos for you from some unstructured Lego based play at our house – otherwise known as everyday!  (Except for the days that Mr. Martini threatens to give all the Lego away to more deserving children unless our own children clean up enough to ensure a clear pathway from door to bed and back…)  You can never have too much lego… it is the ultimate “every”toy…  G.Jr. is the biggest fan – he is the king of creativity in the playroom these days.  Each custom built lego wonder has it’s very own purpose and a story to tell as well…

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(This is, of course, a hat shop.  We have our priorities – everyone needs to have a place to buy quality accessories…)

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It may not look like much, but when you are four it is an entire universe.  I hope you get a chance today to let your kids play – you never know where it will take them!

“Play is often talked about as if it were a relief from serious learning.  But for children, play is serious learning.  Play is the work of childhood.”  (Mr. Rogers)

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